14 Natural Anti-Inflammatory Foods for Dogs You Should Know

14 Natural Anti-Inflammatory Foods for Dogs You Should Know

 

Believe it or not, there are a number of natural anti-inflammatory for dogs that you can use when your canine family member is suffering from pain and discomfort brought on by various inflammations.

 

And the best thing about these all-natural anti-inflammatory for dogs is that it’s highly likely that you’ve already got them in your home. 

 

Using our experience in holistic medicine for the past decade, we at HomeoAnimal have made a commitment to share with other pet parents worldwide completely natural and high-quality products that not just boost the immune system, but also promote the well-being of our animal friends.

 

In this blog post, we will be walking you through the best all-natural anti-inflammatory for dogs that you can go for should your canine family member be afflicted with this health issue. And always remember that we are naturally with you and your pet, every step of the way! 

 

Let’s kick things off by determining what inflammation in dogs really is… 

 

 

What is inflammation in dogs?

 

At its simplest, dog inflammation takes place when the immune system detects unfamiliar “intruders” in a dog’s body such as bacteria, viruses, as well as foreign objects that somehow found their way inside, among others.

 

Once the immune system detects these intruders, it directs the blood vessels to dilate and sends white blood cells—the dog’s body’s natural infection fighters—to the affected area to get rid of the problem. 

 

The physical manifestations of dog inflammation commonly include soreness, swelling, pain, and heat emanating from the affected area. Depending on the severity of the inflammation in dogs, there may also be loss of function in the affected area of the dog’s body.

 

 

When these manifestations occur, your dog could be in for bouts of aches and pains. This is the reason why knowing which natural anti-inflammatory for dogs to use is definitely essential so you can help reduce your canine family member’s discomfort immediately.

 

Now we’ve got that covered, let’s talk about the causes of dog inflammation…

 

 

What causes dog inflammation?

 

There are six (6) common causes of inflammation in dogs, which we’ll briefly describe below:

 

Injury

Injury is the most common cause of dog inflammation. When a dog’s body goes through injury, such as a wound or a splinter, white blood cells are dispatched to the affected area to get rid of any bacteria, fungi, viruses, as well as foreign objects.

 

Infection

Infection causes inflammation in dogs by activating the animal’s immune system’s response to repair damaged tissues. Unlike what some people mistakenly believe, infection is not a type of inflammation. However, inflammation is an indicator that there is an infection in a dog’s body.

 

Genetics and old age

Genetics can trigger dog inflammation if your canine family member has inherited biological characteristics that make him prone to this health issue. As for old age, senior dogs are most likely to experience inflammation due to their weaker immune response.

 

Environmental factors

Environmental factors like pollution and exposure to chemicals can set off inflammation in dogs. A common example of this is a dog constantly getting in contact with cleaning agents such as detergents, bleach, degreasers, abrasives, as well as sanitizers.

 

Food allergies

Inflammation is caused by food allergies when a dog’s immune system identifies a particular type of food, such as chicken and shrimp, as an “intruder.” Some of the more prominent effects of food allergy inflammation include congestion of the airways, joint pains, and digestive issues like diarrhea and constipation.

 

Metabolic diseases

If your dog is suffering from metabolic diseases like diabetes and obesity, he could be prone to inflammation due to the sudden changes in his cellular and hormonal activity. Inflammation caused by metabolic diseases can lead to heart health issues if not given immediate and proper care and attention.

 

Next up, we’ll discuss the symptoms to take note of if your dog is experiencing inflammation…

 

 

What are the symptoms of dog inflammation?

 

The following are the indicators of inflammation in dogs that you should keep an eye out for:

 

  • Constant licking of a particular part of the body
  • Swelling in and around the joint areas like the ankles, shoulders, and elbows
  • Sudden change in mood
  • Lethargy or lack of playfulness
  • Stiffness in movement
  • Lack of appetite

     

    Now let’s have a rundown of the natural anti-inflammatory for dogs that you can use to help get rid of this problem…

     

    Natural anti inflammatory for dogs 

     

    While this may sound surprising, there are a number of all-natural anti-inflammatory for dogs that you can go for if your canine family member is afflicted with this health issue. 

     

    Here’s a quick yet detailed list of the natural anti-inflammatory for dogs that you can use to support your dog when he is going through inflammation:

     

    Dried Comfrey

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reports that comfrey is moderately rich in rosmarinic acid that possesses anti-inflammatory properties. 

     

    One of the effects of rosmarinic acid in the body is it stops the organic compound called malondialdehyde from forming. Malondialdehyde is commonly linked with oxidative stress and inflammation.

     

    To use comfrey as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, combine this dried herb with a bit of water until it forms a thick paste. 

     

    Directly apply the mixture on the affected area of the dog’s body. It is recommended that you wrap the affected area in gauze to avoid the mixture from being knocked out of place. Leave it on for a few hours and replace as soon as the mixture is already dry.

     

    Hawthorn Berries

    According to a study published in ACS Publications, hawthorn berries contain anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial phenolic compounds that can help alleviate the effects of inflammation. These phenolic compounds have also been seen to have gastroprotective properties.

     

    To use hawthorn berries as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, lightly crush up the berries until the juices come out. Liberally apply the juices directly on the affected area as a topical ointment. You can also make a poultice using the leaves and berries of the hawthorn plant to apply on the affected site.

     

    However, it is crucial that you check first if your dog is taking medications for hypertension or heart problems since hawthorn can cause low blood pressure.

     

    Cayenne Pepper

    Mount Sinai shares that cayenne pepper is abundant in a neuropeptide-active agent called capsaicin, which has been seen to help lessen the levels of the pain neurotransmitter referred to as “substance P.” When substance P levels subside, the sensation of pain is significantly reduced.

     

    To use cayenne pepper as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, combine it with a bit of vegetable or sunflower oil until it forms a paste. Lightly massage this paste onto the affected area. Be extra careful not to get this paste on your dog’s eyes, mouth, and nose since it can have a burning sensation that can last for a few minutes.

     

    Spirulina

    As revealed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the blue-green algae spirulina contains an antioxidant called phycocyanin that helps get rid of free radicals that prolong and may even aggravate  the occurrence of inflammation.

     

    Additionally, spirulina also contains fatty acids such as Omega-3 and Omega-6 that also have anti-inflammatory properties.

     

    To use spirulina as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, mix in a couple of pinches of this algae with your dog’s meal. You can also add a dash of spirulina in your dog’s water for the same application.

     

    Fatty Fish 

    According to the Harvard Medical School, fish oil—which is abundant in fatty types of fish like mackerel, anchovies, herring, trout, tuna, and salmon—is rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which have been seen to help alleviate the effects of inflammation.

     

    To harness the natural anti-inflammatory benefits of fatty fish for dogs, make it a point to integrate these fish in your canine family member’s regular diet. However, make sure you only cook the fish plainly without any flavoring or seasoning.  Get rid of the bones while you’re at it, too. Grilling, steaming, or baking works best for this application.

     

    Turmeric Powder

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reports that turmeric contains a chemical compound called curcumin, which helps intercept pain signaling molecules in the cells. Moreover, curcumin has also been found to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

     

    To use turmeric powder as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, add in a couple of pinches of the same to your dog’s water. You can also mix a small amount of turmeric with your canine family member’s meals. Just make sure you don’t add too much since turmeric powder can have a peppery bite when ingested in large quantities.

     

    Yucca Bark and Roots

    A study published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reveals that yucca contains a high amount of polyphenolics like resveratrol that can suppress the formation of nitric oxide, a known inflammatory agent, in the body.

     

    To use yucca as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, lightly mash its bark and roots using a mortar and pestle to form a paste. Directly apply the mixture on the affected area of the dog’s body. It is very important to remember that you need to securely wrap the affected area with a gauze to prevent your dog from licking on the mixture. Reapply once it becomes dry. 

     

    Cinnamon Powder

    As for cinnamon powder, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) shares that the cinnamic acid found in this fragrant spice contains various compounds that help inhibit the production and formation of nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide is known as an inflammatory agent.

     

    To use cinnamon powder as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, combine a teaspoon of this spice with a bit of water to form a paste. You can also add a bit of vegetable oil to make it extra thick. Gently massage the mixture on the affected area and cover with gauze to hold it in place.

     

    Ginger

    Based on a study published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), ginger contains organic substances like shogaol and gingerol that have been found to suppress cytokines and nitric oxide that trigger inflammation in the tissues.

     

    To use cinnamon powder as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, lightly mash a thumb-sized piece of ginger in a mortar and pestle to extract the juices. Directly apply the juices on the affected area and carefully cover it with a piece of gauze.

     

    Make sure the gauze is secured tightly so your dog won’t be able to lick the ginger juice, which can be rather spicy for your canine family member’s taste buds. 

     

    Dried Meadowsweet

    According to the Pharmaceutical Journal, the meadowsweet plant, also known as mead wort, contains a rich amount of several salicylate compounds that have anti-inflammatory effects. Interestingly, the discoverer of acetylsalicylic acid, Felix Hoffmann, used extracts collected from meadowsweet to produce the ingredient that is now used as a main component in conventional drugs used to treat fever and pain.

     

    To use meadowsweet as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, steep the dried leaves and flowers of this plant in hot water for at least ten (10) minutes to activate their salicylate compounds and let it cool down completely. Give your dog a teaspoon of this meadowsweet tea per day until the inflammation subsides.

     

    However, it is important to remember that meadowsweet is not recommended for dogs who are allergic to anticoagulants and salicylates, as well as those suffering from bleeding disorders and kidney issues.

     

    Harpagophytum Roots and Tubers

    Harpagophytum, also called as Devil's claw, has been shown to contain several terpenoids, acetylated phenolic glycosides, as well as iridoid glycosides that have been found to possess anti-inflammatory properties according to ScienceDirect.

     

    To use Devil's claw as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, lightly mash the roots and tubers of this plant until it forms a paste. Apply this paste as a topical ointment on the affected area and secure it tightly with a piece of gauze. Reapply when the paste already becomes dry.

     

    It is crucial to keep in mind that Devil's claw is not recommended for pregnant dogs or if your canine family member is suffering from peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, diabetes, and heart issues.

     

    Boswellia serrata Bark

    As reported by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Boswellia serrata—which is popularly known as the tree where Indian frankincense is harvested from—contains various tetracyclic triterpenic acids, triterpenes, diterpenes, and monoterpenes that inhibit enzymes that cause inflammation.

     

    To use Boswellia serrata as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, crush the bark continuously until the fibers are exposed. Lightly rub these fibers on the affected area and then wrap with a piece of gauze to prevent your dog from licking on the residual moisture. 

     

    It is possible that your dog could be prone to flatulence and mild diarrhea if he ingests a lot of this residual moisture.

     

    Alfalfa

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) shares that above-ground parts of the alfalfa contain fatty acids and cinnamic acid derivatives, which help reduce the pain and discomfort brought on by inflammation.

     

    To harness alfalfa’s benefits as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, use a food processor to grind it up as finely as possible until it has the consistency of thick paste. Gently massage this paste to the affected area. 

     

    Another option you can go for is by directly adding alfalfa to your canine family member’s food. However, it is important that you only mix in a very small amount—say a teaspoonful— since consuming large quantities of this plant can already be harmful to your dog due to its saponin and coumarin content.

     

    Arnica montana

    According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Arnica montana is abundant in phenolic acids, flavonoids, and sesquiterpene lactones that help keep inflammation at bay. It has even been proven to have therapeutic effects when used for the treatment of ecchymosis, edema, as well as post-traumatic pain.

     

    To use Arnica montana as a natural anti-inflammatory for dogs, crush up the flowers of this plant until it has a pulpy texture. Directly apply the pulp to the affected area and cover with gauze to hold it in place. Reapply when the whole thing already becomes dry.

     

    Next up, we’ll reveal the best natural and high-quality product that you should have in your pet checklist when it comes to inflammation in dogs…

     

     

    A completely natural and high-quality product you should consider

     

     

    Natural ANTI-INFLAMMATORY is specifically designed to promote calm and healthy tissues and skin structures in your dog’s body. It also helps maintain or promote healthy skin and coat for your pet.

    This product is made with all-natural ingredients that have inherent skin cleansing and soothing properties such as apis, belladonna, cobalt, copper, kali bich, manganese, phytolacca, pyrogenium, and sulfur.

    If you’re still having a tricky time zeroing in on a completely natural and high-quality ANTI-INFLAMMATORY support to bring comfort to your canine family member, this product is one you should consider having as it will help with many different types of inflammation.

     

     

    Now as for the different types of inflammation, we’re about to discuss them below… 

     

    What are the types of inflammation in dogs?

     

    The term “inflammation” in dogs actually covers a wide range of health issues. Here are the distinct types of dog inflammation that your precious pet could be prone to:

     

    Skin inflammation

    This type of inflammation in dogs typically involves redness, rashes, and bumps on a dog’s skin. It is not uncommon that dogs suffering from skin inflammation can have flaky skin, scabs, and even bald spots in the affected area depending on the severity of the problem.

     

    Enteritis

    Considered as a more concealed type of dog inflammation, enteritis affects the digestive system, particularly the small intestines. Instead of the usual telltale signs of inflammations in dogs like rashes and soreness, enteritis is commonly indicated by vomiting and loose bowel movement.  

     

    Steatitis

    Another type of inflammation in dogs is steatitis. While it is a bit similar to skin inflammation, steatitis primarily affects the adipose or fatty connective tissues. The common indicators of this type of dog inflammation include lumps, swelling, and pronounced tenderness when touched.

     

    Arthritis

    Arthritis takes place when the smooth cartilage that acts as padding in between the joints and bones wears down. This leads to the unwanted scraping of the bones and joints, which doesn’t just limit maximum mobility, but also causes a lot of pain and discomfort. Swelling of the joints can also be observed when arthritis is present.

     

    Next, we’ll tackle the difference between chronic and acute dog inflammation…

     

     

    Difference between chronic and acute inflammation in dogs

     

    Although chronic inflammation and acute inflammation in dogs may seem to be alike, they are actually distinct from each other. How about we differentiate the two terms so you won’t be confused the next time you encounter them?

     

    Acute inflammation in dogs

    When you say “acute dog inflammation,” it means that the immune system is sending out white blood cells to get rid of foreign “intruders” that may have gotten inside a dog’s body. This may have been set off by an injury or illness as well as the adverse effects of a parasitic, viral, or bacterial infection. 

     

    Additionally, a dog’s immune system tends to stop sending out white blood cells to the affected area when the unwanted visitors have already been eliminated.

     

    Chronic dog inflammation 

    On the other hand, chronic inflammation in dogs occurs when a dog’s immune system constantly sends out white blood cells to different parts of the body even though there are no illnesses, injuries or “intruders” such as parasites, viruses, and bacteria to get rid of. 

     

    In this scenario, a dog’s immune system thinks that it is constantly under attack so it keeps on sending out white blood cells to fight the non-existent intruders. Chronic inflammation may eventually lead to the damage of healthy cells and tissues if not given the proper care and attention.

     

    Now we’ve finished covering that bit, let’s talk about what inflammation in dogs looks like…

     

     

    What does inflammation look like on a dog?

     

    There are (5) cardinal signs to look out for when it comes to inflammation in dogs. If you notice that your canine family member is exhibiting the following signs, it is highly likely that he is suffering from inflammation:

     

    1. Redness on the affected area 
    2. Emanation of heat from the affected area 
    3. Tenderness or soreness of the affected area
    4. Presence of swelling or lumps in and around the affected area
    5. Loss of function in the affected area

       

      Next, we’ll discuss the foods that can possibly increase inflammation in dogs…

       

       

      What increases dog inflammation?

       

      Did you know that there are certain types of food that can potentially worsen inflammation in dogs? If your canine family member is experiencing inflammation, make sure you don’t feed him the following:

       

      • Red meat like steaks
      • Refined carbohydrates such as found in rice and breads
      • Trans fats like those in crackers and cookies
      • Products with high fat content such as lard, shortening, and margarine

         

        Now let’s talk about the duration of inflammation in dogs…

         

         

        How long does inflammation last in a dog?

        Depending on the severity and the location of the affected area, inflammation in dogs usually lasts for about a week. It is crucial to keep in mind that the longer an inflammation persists, the more painful and uncomfortable it will be for your canine family member. 

         

        When you need a completely natural and high-quality product to support your dog during inflammation, HomeoAnimal’s ANTI-INFLAMMATORY  is one option you can go for to provide the relief your beloved pet really deserves.

         

        If you’re looking to find out more about all-natural products to keep your dog healthy and happy, make sure you sign up for our Free Health Advisor Guidance right now.

         


        About the Author


        Suzie Cyrenne
        HOMEOPATH & CO-FOUNDER OF HOMEOANIMAL

        Suzie Cyrenne co-founded HomeoAnimal over five years ago, and has worked in naturopathic pet medicine for more than six. Day-to-day, she works as the lead manager for the Homeoanimal staff and specializes in training the team to have thorough knowledge of pet health and the company’s extensive line of naturopathic remedies.

        Suzie has gained a lot of experience from years spent in the pet health field and she earned her degree in Homeopathy at the School of Classical Homeopathy in Quebec, Canada, (a partner of the European Academy of Natural Medicine (AEMN) in France).

        Feel free to contact me anytime at support@homeonanimal.com

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